Choosing the right US Vice President

by


As the November 4, 2008 US presidential election closes in, the Democratic and Republican parties are at high pitch to choose the best vice president nominees to support the candidacy of Barack Obama and John McCain respectively. The idea of having a vice president can be as simple as the reason why there’s the first runner-up in the Miss Universe contest. When the president becomes incapacitated or dies, it’s the vice president who takes over.

A death of the president occurred during the Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s term and Harry Truman, the vice president of 82 days took over. When Pres. John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963 in Texas, vice president Lyndon Johnson ascended as the president. After Pres. Richard Nixon’s resignation in August 9, 1974 on the wake of the Watergate scandal, it paved way to President Gerald Ford to assume the duties of the presidency.

In the last administrations, vice presidents are more active in policy administration than their earlier counterparts. They usually work behind the scene without much glare as the president takes in his position. Al Gore, the vice president of Bill Clinton had a substantial role in defining the environmental policy during their tenure. In the Pres. George W. Bush’s administration, it’s Dick Cheney who silently held sway in foreign policies and the wars of the Iraq and Afghanistan.

As of August 22, 2008, Barack Obama said he has chosen his democratic vice presidential nominee. Delaware’s Sen. Joe Biden, NY’s Sen. Hillary Clinton, Virginia’s Gov. Tim Kaine, Texas’ Rep. Chet Edwards, and Indiana’s Sen. Evan Bayh are likely possibilities. Among them, Hillary with large voting following is thought to be the best to help Obama get elected.

On the opposite side of the political aisle, John McCain on the other hand has a choice in former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, a Mormon with strong credentials in business and economy vetted by political analysts. Considered with Romney in the Republican camp are Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, and Homeland Security Head Tom Ridge.

Whoever is the choice in both the Republican and Democratic parties, the veep pick has the capacity to influence the outcome of the presidential race. A choice with strong exposure in foreign policy like Biden could help the young Barack Obama who has a vision of change, but lacks validation of experience. On the other hand, John McCain from Arizona with a solid track record of public service will be helped by a nominee that’s away from his home base— like Romney who’s from the Northeast. Therefore, the choice for vice president considers the maximum votes the party can get for the party to win and help in the governance once the US president is elected. =0=

Breaking News: Democrat Sen. Joe Biden of Delaware is announced on August 23, 2008 as Barack Obama’s vice presidential nominee.

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