Archive for the ‘Broadway’ Category

Lucid interval in acute brain injuries: a crucial lesson on Natasha Richardson’s death

March 20, 2009

The death of Broadway star and movie actress Natasha Richardson illustrates the necessity for quick trauma management in cases of acute brain injuries. In hindsight, Richardson didn’t go to the hospital immediately after she banged her head during a ski accident in Mont Tremblant, a luxury resort in Quebec, Canada.

She had a lucid interval and a feeling of wellness not unusual in some victims of head injury. At that crucial time, blood seeped from a torn blood vessel between the brain and skull creating an epidural hematoma, an enlarging blood clot that was big enough to cause her demise. The New York medical examiner confirmed the epidural bleeding from blunt trauma that caused her death.

Richardson, the daughter of famed actress Vanessa Redgrave was conscious and well soon after the ski accident. She refused early on to be brought to the nearest hospital, hence a delay of about 4 hours before life-saving treatment was instituted. Only when she experienced headache, a sign of rising pressure within the enclosed cranium that she decided to go for the doctors’ aid.

There are questions whether an early medical intervention could have saved her life. Perhaps yes. There is a short golden period in those suffering from acute epidural bleed when doctors can still save a life. From Canada, she was flown to Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City where she passed on a day later.

The coffin bearing the remains of the talented celebrity was taken out of the Greenwich Funeral Home in Manhattan. Lights of Broadway were dimmed to pay tribute to Miss Richardson, a Tony award winner and a member of a family of distinguished movie and theatre thespians. (Photo Credit: Mickey Strikes; Reuters/ Eric Thayer)=0=

RELATED BLOG: “Broadway star Natasha Richardson died of brain injuries in a ski accident” Posted by mesiamd at 3/19/2009

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Lucid interval in acute brain injuries: a crucial lesson on Natasha Richardson’s death

March 20, 2009

The death of Broadway star and movie actress Natasha Richardson illustrates the necessity for quick trauma management in cases of acute brain injuries. In hindsight, Richardson didn’t go to the hospital immediately after she banged her head during a ski accident in Mont Tremblant, a luxury resort in Quebec, Canada.

She had a lucid interval and a feeling of wellness not unusual in some victims of head injury. At that crucial time, blood seeped from a torn blood vessel between the brain and skull creating an epidural hematoma, an enlarging blood clot that was big enough to cause her demise. The New York medical examiner confirmed the epidural bleeding from blunt trauma that caused her death.

Richardson, the daughter of famed actress Vanessa Redgrave was conscious and well soon after the ski accident. She refused early on to be brought to the nearest hospital, hence a delay of about 4 hours before life-saving treatment was instituted. Only when she experienced headache, a sign of rising pressure within the enclosed cranium that she decided to go for the doctors’ aid.

There are questions whether an early medical intervention could have saved her life. Perhaps yes. There is a short golden period in those suffering from acute epidural bleed when doctors can still save a life. From Canada, she was flown to Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City where she passed on a day later.

The coffin bearing the remains of the talented celebrity was taken out of the Greenwich Funeral Home in Manhattan. Lights of Broadway were dimmed to pay tribute to Miss Richardson, a Tony award winner and a member of a family of distinguished movie and theatre thespians. (Photo Credit: Mickey Strikes; Reuters/ Eric Thayer)=0=

RELATED BLOG: “Broadway star Natasha Richardson died of brain injuries in a ski accident” Posted by mesiamd at 3/19/2009

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Broadway star Natasha Richardson died of brain injuries in a ski accident

March 19, 2009

Forty-five year old Natasha Richardson, daughter of well-known actress Vanessa Redgrave died on March 18, 2009 in Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan, New York following a ski accident in Montreal Canada. The acclaimed movie personality was with her husband Liam Neeson and two children in the resort.

“Liam Neeson, his sons, and the entire family are shocked and devastated by the tragic death of their beloved Natasha,” the statement said. “They are profoundly grateful for the support, love and prayers of everyone, and ask for privacy during this very difficult time.”—- Yahoo News/ AP (03/18/09, Italie, H)

The star of the Tony award-winning Broadway revival Cabaret, Natasha apparently suffered head injuries during a ski training fall in Mont Tremblant resort in Quebec.

Richardson was not wearing a protective headgear during the accident last Monday. The movie celebrity was initially asymptomatic, but was admitted at a local hospital in Canada after complaining of headaches. She was later flown to New York City for further treatment, but died not long after hospital confinement. The granddaughter of reknown British actor Sir Michael Redgrave and the niece of actress Lynne Redgrave, her death was announced by Alan Nierob, her husband’s publicist. (Photo Credit: AP/ Joel Ryan) =0=

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Fiddler on the Roof”s "Do you love me?"

February 14, 2009

“Love seems the swiftest, but it is the slowest of all growths. No man or woman really knows what perfect love is until they have been married a quarter of a century.”—Mark Twain

On February 14, it’s nice to recall the exchange between the ageing Teyve and Golde, the interesting Jewish couple in the old musicale “Fiddler on the Roof.” Their lives seem to affirm what writer-humorist Mark Twain was trying to say about the mystery of the heart. From one of the most unforgettable Broadway shows, here is the sing-song conversation about love: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_y9F5St4j0&feature=related

(Tevye)
“Golde, I have decided to give Perchik permission to become engaged to our daughter, Hodel.”

(Golde)
“What??? He’s poor! He has nothing, absolutely nothing!”

(Tevye)
“He’s a good man, Golde.
I like him. And what’s more important, Hodel likes him. Hodel loves him.
So what can we do?
It’s a new world… A new world. Love. Golde…”

Do you love me?

(Golde)
Do I what?

(Tevye)
Do you love me?

(Golde)
Do I love you?
With our daughters getting married
And this trouble in the town
You’re upset, you’re worn out
Go inside, go lie down!
Maybe it’s indigestion

(Tevye)
“Golde I’m asking you a question…”

Do you love me?

(Golde)
You’re a fool

(Tevye)
“I know…”

But do you love me?

(Golde)
Do I love you?
For twenty-five years I’ve washed your clothes
Cooked your meals, cleaned your house
Given you children, milked the cow
After twenty-five years, why talk about love right now?

(Tevye)
Golde, The first time I met you
Was on our wedding day
I was scared

(Golde)
I was shy

(Tevye)
I was nervous

(Golde)
So was I

(Tevye)
But my father and my mother
Said we’d learn to love each other
And now I’m asking, Golde
Do you love me?

(Golde)
I’m your wife

(Tevye)
“I know…”
But do you love me?

(Golde)
Do I love him?
For twenty-five years I’ve lived with him
Fought him, starved with him
Twenty-five years my bed is his
If that’s not love, what is?

(Tevye)
Then you love me?

(Golde)
I suppose I do

(Tevye)
And I suppose I love you too

(Both)
It doesn’t change a thing
But even so
After twenty-five years
It’s nice to know.

[Thanks to amcanclini@yahoo.com for lyrics] Source: http://www.stlyrics.com/f/fiddlerontheroof.htm (Photo Credits: sundaygirl; greypoint)

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY!

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T. S. Eliot and the magical cats

October 24, 2008

The naming of cats is a difficult matter. It isn’t just one of your holiday games. You may think at first I’m mad as a hatter. When I tell you a cat must have three different names…” – T.S. Eliot

Thomas Stearns Eliot (Sept. 26, 1888-Jan. 4 1965,) the famous dramatist, critic, and poet who won the 1948 Nobel Prize in literature wrote on the cat’s human-like temperament, behavior, and social disposition.

His book of light verse called “ Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats ” is a collection of imaginative poems which he shared with children.

Published in 1939, his written work on Felis catus (Linnaeus) was the basis of the successful long-running Broadway show: Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Cats.” After its closure in 2000 in the Winter Garden Theatre, “Cats” which widely appealed to children and adults alike became one of Great White Way’s most memorable theatre musicales.

The same cats are featured in the 6th Annual CFA-lams Cat Championship in Madison Square Garden in New York, New York which runs till the third week of October 2008. The endearing feline masterpieces are no different from those adored and whimsically described from Egyptian antiquities over the millennia.

In the cat exhibition, the calm aloof winner is Blade Runner, the Russian blue cat with a detached luminous look and seemingly independent, sometimes obstinate disposition. He is dubbed as the best in the show. With his colored award ribbon, he quietly sits still, perhaps to think of important things other than the vanity of winning.

The fluffy brown sleepy ball of fur with pampered chink pair of lazy eyes is called Rusty, the Persian cat. He curls up to take time for his extended nap, an average of 16 hours a day required by his species.

There is the costumed feline glamour with green standing plumage on her head, sporting that erect pair of large sensitive ears and mysterious worried gaze. Her name is Masquerade, the Sphynx cat. She is cared for by doting owner Sandra Alder.

Other notables in the show with remarkable soft manes, proud tails, and splendid names are Pocahontas, Baldwin, Renegade, Winter, Jay Jay, and Rizzo who wowed the feline lovers in the crowd. Nowhere to be found is the sly, agile, and conjuring Mr. Mistoffelees, one of T.S. Eliot’s beloved cats. (Photo Credits: jonathanmoreau; ChipEast/Reuters; FrankFranklinII/AFP; http://www.faber.com.uk; yokviv; fofurasfelinas) =0=

When you notice a cat in profound meditation,
The reason, I tell you, is always the same:
His mind is engaged in a rapt contemplation
Of the thought, of the thought, of the thought of his name
.”

The Rum Tum Tugger is a terrible bore:
When you let him in, then he wants to be out;
He’s always on the wrong side of every door,
And as soon as he’s at home, then he’d like to get about.
He likes to lie in the bureau drawer,
But he makes such a fuss if he can’t get out.”

“OH!
Well I never!
Was there ever
A cat so clever
As Magical Mr. Mistoffelees
!” —T.S. Eliot



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Nostalgic Connections

June 11, 2008

April completed her pre-college schooling in Cardington, Ohio. It was in this quaint beautiful midwestern American town where the Rotary scholar, Dr. May Magdalene V. Yorobe’s daughter, started learning about the world away from home. Dr. Yorobe, a UP Ibalonian, came to visit her only girl right before graduation. She traveled the north central states to Ohio and went as far as Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York to discover, learn, and answer a few questions.

What is the most helpful tool in your travel bag?
A cell phone.

Why did you come without George, your hubby?
George wanted to be with me, but he’s busy in Manila. With his tight schedule, he can’t even go home to Bicol as much as he wanted to.

What comes next for your daughter April now that she has finished school in Ohio?
She’ll proceed with nursing when she returns to Manila this June. She desires to help the sick and perhaps take care of me when I grow old (laughter.)

You’ve been in many places in America. Which was the most memorable?
Washington, DC. I loved the energy and message of the Memorial Day celebration. The historic pieces of Americana shown in the parade were stunning. I was elated by the sights and sounds of native Indians in their colorful feathered costumes, the contingent of old war veterans, and the beautiful song “God Bless America.”

Did you connect with Filipinos in your travel?
Definitely. I made many connections even with people I met for the first time. I couldn’t forget the petite Filipina sweetly wrapped around a burly black guy I saw in Maryland. In her tight-fitting tube blouse and matching miniskirt, the Pinay looked more American to me than most of the people around. Yet, she gave me a friendly, warm, and generous smile which I thought was lacking among other Filipinos I encountered elsewhere.

How did it feel to be in Broadway this summer?
The warm weather made my light clothes from Naga wearable in Manhattan. On sunny days, the tall buildings stood with ample shade to make sunblock unnecessary. New York City looked massively claustrophobic, but the spires and glass buildings were awesome. In that crowded strip of earth in Times Square the giant neon lights were ablaze even at noontime. The Phantom of the Opera still stalked viewers at the Majestic Theatre and to my surprise, a number of Filipinos lined up to watch the show after a very long run.

What were your thoughts when you stood at the site of 9/11?
The rugged huge hole in the ground where the Twin Towers once stood made me sad. I recalled the 4,000 innocent lives which were lost when the terrorists crashed the airplanes into the buildings. It’s good another edifice, a magnificent memorial for the fallen ones, is about to rise above ground zero and reaches out for the sky.

How did you react upon seeing Ibalonians you never saw for many years?
I couldn’t help, but yell on top of my voice during the reunion. I wanted to recapture the past that suddenly materialized in front of me. It seemed eternity that I waited so long to see them. No wonder loads of stories came flowing in— They brought back the wonderful past and the glowing present. The future, we talked about with hope, optimism, and great joy.

Who were the Ibalonians you met and those you missed?

In Wisconsin, I visited Dr. Ramon Ray G. Rayel and his family. Ray has still that gracious voice that tickles my funny bone. In Indiana, I found Dr. Divinia Nolasco-Reis brimming with hospitality. Her stories were plucked straight from the heart— red-hot and spicy. In New York, Dr. Totie Mesia got a trove of memories which made me feel good about how friendships evolve, mellow, and last through the years. We planned a huddle with fellow-Ibalonians Raniela Barbaza and Bingbing Badiola-Bretan somewhere in Queens. It didn’t happen. We simply lacked time. I wanted to see Dr. Yasmin Paje-Banzon and Gods A. Lanuza in Vancuover, BC, but they were off my itinerary.

When will you come back?
As soon as possible, preferably when George is ready to go with me in USA. =0=