Archive for the ‘food’ Category

Obama fried chicken for lunch

April 6, 2009

Although his approval rating isn’t as high as when he assumed the presidency, the first Afro-American US president is still very popular. Barack Obama mania still rages as one can see in a fried chicken store in New York City.

According to New York Daily News, at least two fried chicken joints have baptized themselves as Obama Fried Chicken. They are probably just riding on the popularity of the president and many are buying. (Photo Credit: Rob Bennett, NY Times/Redux, New York Daily News) =0=

Obama fried chicken for lunch

April 6, 2009

Although his approval rating isn’t as high as when he assumed the presidency, the first Afro-American US president is still very popular. Barack Obama mania still rages as one can see in a fried chicken store in New York City.

According to New York Daily News, at least two fried chicken joints have baptized themselves as Obama Fried Chicken. They are probably just riding on the popularity of the president and many are buying. (Photo Credit: Rob Bennett, NY Times/Redux, New York Daily News) =0=

Michele Obama serves lunch in a soup kitchen

March 6, 2009

As many charitable people have done through the ages, giving one’s time to assist the poor is one of the best ways to help the community. That’s what US First Lady Michele Obama did on Thursday, March 5, 2009 at Miriam’s Kitchen in Washington, DC when she served food for the homeless.

While the economic crisis deepens, people need encouragement to assist those who’re in need—just like what this privately-funded charity has been doing for the more than 2 decades. (Photo Credit: AFP/ Tim Sloan) =0=

When “tuyo” is fried in a high-rise apartment, the smell of gas leak and cadaveric decomposition becomes a legal problem

January 15, 2009

Gloria Lim and her husband Michael are in trouble. They are being sued for $75,000 by the nuns of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart congregation for violating a building rule that prohibits the cooking of “smelly food.” —Philippine News / Philstar (01/15/08, Pastor, C)

The NY Fire Department was called by building residents because of stench which emanated from the Lim’s 16th floor Manhattan apartment. The awful smell alarmed neighbors who thought there was a decaying body in the building. The firemen broke the door and found that the odor came from “tuyo”—- fried dried fish (herring or anchovy) which is a common breakfast food in the Philippines.

Cooking “ethnic” flood is a common problem particularly during winter months in high-rise buildings when doors and windows are generally shut tight. Any smell from a housing unit can be magnified and bother a lot of neighbors. Though others can tolerate smells of certain food, it is better such malodorous food must be avoided.

Gloria Lim, the pissed Filipina who has been in the US for 30 years must know better. She must be considerate to her neighbors who can’t take the peculiar smell of “tuyo.” The strong fishy odor which sticks to clothes is cumbersome to remove—entailing more laundry or visits to professional apparel cleaners. It is understandable that residents who haven’t experienced such an olfactory oddity from a peculiar food may panic believing that it’s from a gas leak that’s ready to explode or from a dead human body or animal decaying in the building. That’s precisely why buildings have rules to protect the common interest of residents. Cultural sensitivity and respect must be observed in communal living where people of different races stay together. (Photo Credit: Mando Rukot) =0=

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Seminar on Immunoglobulin-rich Milk (IgCo)

January 7, 2009

Dr. Amy Goleta-Dy of St. Luke’s Medical Center Pediatric Oncology Department announces a product presentation and information dissemination seminar on the varied uses of Ig-Co, the colostrum-based milk product developed in New Zealand. The nutritive bovine milk packed with disease-fighting immunoglobulins (antibodies) will be the central topic in conferences slated in the following dates and venues:

1. January 16, 2009, 5:30 p.m. at Villa Caceres, Magsaysay Avenue, Naga City
2. January 18, 2009, 2:00 p.m. at Casablanca Hotel, Penaranda, Legazpi City
3. January 24, 2009, 3:00 p.m. at Waterfront Hotel, Lahug, Cebu City

“The newly introduced product is helpful for a lot of medical conditions including those with diabetes, asthma, allergies, patients with disordered and depressed immunity (immunocompromised,) cancer patients on chemotherapy, and those with chronic kidney problems and osteoporosis.” Colostrum Conference in Bicol (10/28/08, mesiamd)

Open to the public (free,) the seminars are suggested for those who might benefit from taking IgCo and those who want to promote the product in their respective communities. For more information contact: Dr. Amy Goleta-Dy at 09178126135 or Agnes at 09175802301 (Photo Credit: Tambakothejaguar) =0=

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Shrinking pan de sal doesn’t mean it’s economical

December 9, 2008

Filipinos will generally welcome pan de sal that is cheap even if it’s small. According to Simplicio Umali, Jr., the president of the Philippine Bakers Industry Group, bakers will shrink the bread further and sell it cheap. Members of the baker’s association agreed to make little pan de sals, probably next month.

The poor man’s bread at P1 peso will weigh only 20 grams, smaller than the regular pan de sal which is 30-35 grams sold for P3 pesos. The cost of a 600-gram bread loaf is pegged at P55.50.—Philstar (12/09/08, Osorio, E.)

Isn’t 20 grams too small? How much of the bread is air and how much is flour? Why try scrimping on the last indulgence of Filipinos who rely on the bread for breakfast and snacks? Most likely, smaller pan de sals will make people crave for more and perhaps spend more.

Whether this tiny bread prepared is nutritionally adequate to satisfy the hungry is unclear. Though affordable, a smaller version of the bread doesn’t mean it is economical. Making small bread pieces is labor-intensive and needs as much flour and packaging if it will be sold to satisfy. That’s why there are those who think keeping the regular-sized bread may still be a good idea.

When the bread becomes inordinately small, it’s expected to have low nutritional value. Shrunken and cheap, the bread will make the birds happy. Yet people with larger stomachs and bigger caloric needs may feel famished eating them. To compensate they’ll need to eat more which costs as much as the regular bread, volume per volume. (Photo Credit: Oggi108; KDLig)=0=

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"Asocena": more than 70 dogs for food

December 4, 2008

In cultures where dogs are celebrated as pets, security aids, rescue workers, guards, loyal companions, and friends, one can be horrified to know how they are slaughtered for food by humans. In spite of the risk of diseases like rabies, in many places in Asia like in China, Vietnam, and the Philippines, dogs are raised and killed for food. Stray mongrels are snared and cooked as “delicacy” even if it’s against the law.

Every so often we hear of hapless dogs bound for slaughter. The horrendous plight of these animals before dying is appalling. This is exactly what is reported by Julie Aurelio of PDI (12/04/08) of more than 70 canines intercepted in a van in SM North Edsa Manila. It’s in the nick of time that the dogs have been rescued before they become “aso” which means dog and “cena,” supper.

The police arrested Ernesto Zapata and companion Jason Ortega who said the canines came from Laguna and are headed Baguio City for sale. The Philippine Society of Cruelty of Animals took custody of the confiscated dogs, 20 of which are pregnant. Let’s be kind to animals. (Photo Credits: Tibble) =0=

Kahit saan man, ang patis ay ‘di malimutan

November 29, 2008

kwento ni Raniela (Miles) Barbaza

May patis na kami!” Isang nakakatuwang kwento ng isang Ibalonian ng napunta siya at ang kanyang kapatid sa Gallup, New Mexico. Sa kalayu-layo ng Pilipinas, hanap-hanap pa rin nila sa dulo ng mundo ang patis na walang katulad.—mesiamd (11/29, 08)

Tatlong taon na ang orosipong ito pero tulad ng ibinubulong ng matandang salitang Bikolnon para sa kwento – ang orosipon, hindi natatapos. Patuloy ang masayang kwento: ang ating orosipon.” —RB, November 28, 2008, New York City

Hindi ko alam sa inyo pero para sa amin ng kapatid kong si Isang hindi maaaring walang patis ang nilaga o sinigang. Imajinin nga ninyo – nilagang walang patis? Pede ba iyon? Sinigang na walang patis? Mas lalong hindi pede.

Halos dalawang buwan na kami dito sa Gallup, New Mexico bago kami nagkaroon ng patis. Kaming dalawa ang tinatawag na mga bagong salta. Nitong nakaraang August 10 lamang nang dumating kami dito sa Gallup, isang bayan na may isa’t kalahati hangga’t dalawang oras na biyahe ang layo mula sa Albuquerque.

Noong unang linggo namin dito, sinubukan naming gawing Amerikano ang aming tiyan. Tutal, pagyayabang namin sa sarili namin, sanay naman tayong kumain ng Jollibee at Mcdonald’s sa Pilipinas. Sige, wheat bread at palaman. Pero hindi namin nakumbinsi ang aming mga tiyan. Sari-saring tunog ang nililikha ng mga tiyan namin. Brrrrrrrg. Mrrrrngk. Pop. Parang nagmumumog o kumukulog o pumuputok na mga tunog ang maya’t maya’y naririnig namin mula sa mga tiyan namin.

Nang maglaon, tiyan na namin ang hindi mapakanali. Okey. Suko na kami. Kailangan namin ng kanin at ulam! Sumugod kami sa nilalakad lang namin na supermarket (wala kaming kotse). Diretso sa aisle ng bigas. Ok. Hayun, rice. Isang maliit na supot lang? Di bale. Sige. Ano pa. Ulam.

Anong ulam natin? Nilagang baka para may mahigop na sabaw (nilalamig na agad kami kahit na summer pa daw dito). Ok. Beef stew cuts. Ito na siguro iyon. Tapos repolyo. Patatas. Carrots. Beans. Saging saba… walang saging na saba?! Ok, di bale. Sibuyas. Tsek. Patis na lang.

Ah, ok sa condiments na tayo. Wala. Fish sauce. Hanap tayo ng fish sauce. Saan? Baka kakaiba lang ang bote dito ng patis. Diyan sa shelf na iyan? Teka baka dito. Wala. Walaaaa.

Doon namin naalala na usapin rin ng identidad ang panlasa. Pero, siyempre pa, ang identidad ay likha ng taga-ngalan. Kailangang ikonteksto ang paghahanap ng patis sa pananaw ng mga tagarito sa New Mexico. Sa madaling salita, sino ba kami sa pananaw ng mga taga-rito?

Pinilit naming kalimutan na, basta tao kaming nagugutom. Alalahanin ang mga form na sinusulatan. Please check ethnicity (optional). Oriental. Asian. Minsan may tiyak na box para sa Filipino. O kaya, doon ka sa mga walang identitad: other. Ok, sikapin na alalahanin hanapin ang karatulang may tanda ng identidad.

Dahil iniisip namin tiyak na may patis dito, kailangan lang nating matuklasan kung nasaang aisle. May iba naman sigurong mga Pinoy dito. Siyempre mangangailangan din sila ng patis. Elementary economics ba iyon ? Ang alam ko, kung may demand, may supply. Natitiyak naman namin na magdedemand ang mga dila ng mga Pinoy dito ng patis, kaya mayroong magsu-supply. Luminga-linga kami. Binasa ang mga karatula sa itaas ng mga aisle. Talagang wala. Walang Oriental food. O Asian food. O International food. Ooops eto, Chinese food! Preno kami ng kapatid ko. Dalawang shelves na may habang tatlong piye siguro. Pero walang patis. Walaaang patis! Bumili na lang kami ng toyo sa isang kakaibang bote.

Kinabukasan, ibinalita sa akin ni Isang na ang sabi ng kaniyang katrabahong Chinese, sa Albuquerque pa raw sila namimili ng oriental food. Whooaah! Sa Alburqeurque pa? Para sa aming mga bagong saltang walang kotse, para na rin nilang sinabing sa Pilipinas pa makakabili ng patis.

Pero tulad ng iba pang malilit na bahagi ng buhay migranteng bagong salta, unti-unti nasanay na rin kaming magluto ng nilagang toyo ang pampaalat. Nasanay na rin kaming umasa sa microwave na nabili namin sa halagang $10 sa isang yard sale: pampainit ng tubig, ng kaning lamig at tirang ulam.

Nasanay na kaming gumamit ng mainit na tubig sa pagligo sa halip ng dati ay hinahanap-hanap na malamig na tubig na pampaalis ng banas sa Pilipinas. Nasanay na kaming ulit-ulitin ang aming sinasabi hanggang sa maintindihan ng kausap. Ng pagbigkas ng salitang bank na halos behnk. Ng pagdala ng jacket saan man pumunta dahil hindi nangangahulugang mainit ang panahon kahit na tirik na tirik ang araw. Ng pagbitbit ng tigalawang galon ng inuming tubig mula sa supermarket. Ng matitigan dahil sa kakaibang itsura o pananalita.

Naiintindihan siguro ng Diyos ang paghahanap namin sa patis. Isang araw, tumawag ang Uncle Romy namin mula sa Norwalk, California. Oy, mga bagong saltang dalaga. May pupunta diyan na mga Pinoy na madre. Pitong taon na sila diyan sa Gallup. Ipinagbilin ko kayo.

Mga madreng misyonero na nagtuturo sa Catholic School dito sa Gallup. Na tulad ng ibang migrante dito, natutong mag-drive! Dinala nila kaming magkapatid sa Philippine Cuisine, isang bagong Pilipinong restaurant daw na may ilang bilihing Pilipino.

Ah! Para kaming mga batang nakakita ng mga kendi. Bumili kami ng patis, toyo, suka (hindi distilled ha!), balat ng lumpiang shanghai, tumigas na sa lamig na tilapia, tinapa at bihon!

Sa katunayan, hindi naman pala kami nag-iisa sa pananatiling Pinoy ng panlasa. Sinubukan kong i-Google minsan ang humba dahil naalala ko ang masarap na pork humba sa Rodic’s sa eskwelahang pinangungulilahan ko.

Aba! Sandamakmak na blogs at sites ang umapir! Pinoy. Pinay. Kung saan-saan. Nananatiling Pinoy at Pinay nasaan man sila ngayon. Nagpapayabangan ng mga alam na nilang lutuing Pinoy na dati-rati’y hindi pinapansin ang pagluluto at basta na lamang kinakain sa kusina ng kanilang lola/lolo o nanay/tatay o sa kalapit na karinderia.

Kaya ngayong tanghalian, habang balot ng medyas, pajama at sweater, hinihigop namin ang mainit na sinigang na mayroon nang patis. Ang tanong naming dalawang bagong migrante ngayon: anong bahagi ang hindi matitinag sa pagiibang bayan? (Photo Credits: Chboogs; nikita2471; Chotda; Jab58; http://www.tastingmenu.com; chotda; nikita2471; knottypine)=0=

The “paradoxical” faces of hunger: obesity and emaciation

November 18, 2008


A report shows the United States is beset with hunger problem just like the poor countries of the world. The US Department of Agriculture reports that 50% more American children compared to the previous year suffered hunger in 2007. Other findings are:

“_Some 691,000 children went hungry in America sometime in 2007 (above the 430,000 in 2006.) About one in eight Americans (12.5%) struggled to feed themselves adequately even before this year’s sharp economic downtown.

_The families with the highest rates of food insecurity were headed by single mothers (30.2 percent), black households (22.2 percent), Hispanic households (20.1 percent), and households with incomes below the official poverty line (37.7 percent).

_States with families reporting the highest prevalence of food insecurity during
2005-2007 were Mississippi (17.4 percent), New Mexico (15 percent), Texas (14.8 percent) and Arkansas (14.4 percent.)

_The highest growth in food insecurity over the last 9 years came in Alaska and Iowa, both of which saw a 3.7 percent increase in families who struggled to eat adequately or had substantial food disruptions.)”—Associated Press; Yahoo.news.com (11/17/08, Sniffen, MJ)

What constitutes hunger for Americans is a bit unsettled compared to those who endure apparent lack of food in other countries. Although the definition of hunger isn’t clear, it is appalling that the richest country on earth is reported to suffer hunger like the Philippines, one among the top five world nations which deals with lack of food.

Understanding food deprivation in USA is hard given the tremendous resources the nation has. Many of its “hungry” people are obese and are within arms way from government welfare services which are meager or almost non-existent in the Third World. Sixty-five (65%) of the Americans suffer from excessive weight; among them are those who complain of hunger. Paradoxically, even the overweights experience hunger. Fat people are seen quite regularly lining up in welfare offices, food stamp lines, social service agencies, and soup kitchens.

It seems hunger looks differently in USA than in other places that most people know. In the Third World, the hungry are usually underweight and emaciated—- the usual signs of malnutrition from pervasive lack of food and high incidence of diseases. Each day the poor struggle to eat, mostly subsisting on skimpy food devoid of essential nutrients which explains their thinness. The social milieu in which they live shows food scarcity—-unlike in USA where faulty food distribution is the problem.

Where food supply is abundant and readily available, obesity is traced to poor eating habits. Inadequate knowledge on nutrition, lack of exercise, and alternating over-eating and undisciplined binging are leading reasons for their excessive weight. Concurrent illnesses and the influence of genes are blamed for some forms of obesity, but almost all emaciated people suffer from lack of food and/or concomitant diseases.

So there’s the clue why people who go hungry can’t be easily recognized by their appearances. It’s interesting to know how many among the obese complain of hunger in America while in the rest of the world, the hungry are physically wasting away. It’s sobering to think how Americans could suffer hunger in the midst of plenty. (Photo Credits: Calvaryslo; MioCade; ClaudeBarute; ItuDk) =0=

RELATED BLOG: ‘Hunger in the Philippines” Posted by mesiamd at 11/05/2008

Hunger in the Philippines

November 5, 2008

Listed in decreasing order of countries with hunger problem, the Philippines (40%) ranked 5th with Cameroon (55%,) Pakistan (53%,) Nigeria (48%,) Peru (42%,) topping the list. For lack of food, 4 out of 10 households (40%) or about 35 million Filipinos face hunger. The finding is worse but consistent with Manila’s Social Weather Stations poll (SWS) showing that the average hunger for 2008 is about 16.8%.

Regardless of the surveys’ accuracy what is important is to recognize the need to solve the worsening poverty, malnutrition, and food deprivation in the country. Bulacan Bishop Jose Oliveros of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines said:

Granted the survey holds true, the government should make concrete pro-poor programs to make sure every household gets enough nutritious food to feed their family” GMA TV News (11/05/08)

Oliveros blame corruption, not overpopulation as the main cause of rampant hunger. It is most severe in Metro Manila where 500,000 families suffer lack of food. He asks the government to put up programs like providing employment to the poor so that “ramdam ang gutom” reverses into “ramdam ang kaunlaran.” (Photo Credit: Jaridaking) =0=