Archive for the ‘Ibalonians’ Category

Bicol Vignette: Bambi Ricafrente’s Antero

December 17, 2008

“Though a non-Chinese, Antero grew up in China. He was only about five when he migrated to that country with his stepfather, a Chinese merchant, who brought him along in place of his mother, who had refused to board the boat when it was time to leave. He had been orphaned by his Filipino father soon after his birth in January 1900 in Albay, a Philippine province famed as much for the majestic Mount Mayon as for its dishes done in generous amounts of coconut milk and the hottest of peppers – the siling labuyo.”—Antero (12/17/08, Ricafrente, B)

Many lives go their usual pace until they reach terminus without being written; their unchronicled mundane beauty are regrettably lost forever. Yet, UP Ibalon’s Barbara M. Ricafrente (Bambi) does it differently. For posterity, she shares a crisp and fascinating tale of a guy whose “breath was sweet as the White Rabbit candies.”

Read her. Posted in the blog, her scintillating story cuts across an extraordinary Bicol experience. The deservedly admired work effectively knocks open the door of our soul—as if we’re back home again for a holiday.—mesiamd(12/17/08)

RELATED BlOG: “Antero,” posted by Barbara M. Ricafrente at 12/17/2008

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Bicol Gubatnon or Southern Sorsogon Bicol

August 31, 2008

Decades ago i dread going to Bulan, Sorsogon. Though fluent in many Bikol dialects I really can’t follow what the residents of Southern Sorsogon speak. I came to know later that residents of that area also have difficulty following the spoken dialects of Daraga, Albay and Legazpi City once they go in those places. I just told myself, “Hah, Bikol dialects are really much different from each other.”

Decades later I came across the website “Ethnologue” which is one of the most-known language classification services, widely-cited and used by some official agencies.  And, lo and behold, (surprise! surprise!) it classifies Bikol Gubatnon or Southern Sorsogon Bikol as a Waray dialect. I asked myself, “How can that be?”.

Trying to resolve the puzzle I texted a friend in Gubat, Sorsogon. I asked her if she can understand Samarnon. She answered, “Yes, almost entirely.” Wow! “We can talk with Samarenos directly without translation.” “Do you realize Ethnologue classifies your dialect as Waray?”. “Oh, I didn’t know that!”.

I am wondering now what Ibalonians coming from Southern Sorsogon have to say on this.

(Map credit: globalpinoy)