Archive for the ‘Northern Samar’ Category

Some Floodings Explained: The Conflict Between Man and Nature

January 16, 2009


These recent days heavy floodings have been reported in some parts of the Philippines–Northern Samar, the Agusan provinces (flooding due to the swelling of Agusan River), Cagayan de Oro (flooding due to the overflowing of Cagayan River of its banks), Iligan City and Linamon in Lanao del Norte, Capiz and Cagayan provinces.

The rains might have been frequent but not really that strong. And flood-prone areas like Metro Manila and Central Luzon were generally spared this time. But all know that during the habagat (southwest monsoons) those areas are almost always flooded when the heavy rains come.

If one will notice all of these now-flooded areas lie to the north of the island to where they belong. The floodings were due to the overflowing of the banks of their rivers which all flow northward.

Funny that the reporter in Lanao del Norte charged that “storm surge” was the cause of the flooding. What he meant was the rivers cannot empty to the sea (causing it to rise) because there’s a surge coming from the sea. A sea surge, yes, but not a “storm surge” because there’s no storm.

This sea surge fuelled by the amihan (northwest moonsoon) is capping the flow to the sea of these northward-flowing rivers. That’s why the river banks are being breached. And also why flooding occurs in the upper reaches of the rivers.

This is one relationship that people must understand. A strong amihan produce a southward-flowing sea surge capping the northward-flowing rivers thereby slowing their capacity to empty to sea and this in turn cause the river to overflow its banks. During habagat, the relationship is reversed. Southward-flowing rivers are bottled up by the sea surge going north.

If tropical cyclones or typhoons are not all bad so do this phenomenon. Storms and typhoons are the primary elements the sea and oceans have in order to cleanse themselves. Sea surges and storm surges have the capability to push back river flows. It is known that Manila Bay sea water even enters the Laguna de Bay through the Pasig River and these cleanses the lake. Flooding and the entry of sea water does the same for rivers.

But herein lies the classic confrontation between man and nature. In the olden days man will simply just give way to nature. But with ever-burgeoning population pressures and urbanization man now occupy nature’s former path.

And so disasters occur.

[Photo credit:Agence France-Presse]

Floods in Gingoog City, Northern Samar, and Misamis Oriental drive thousands to evacuate

January 12, 2009

The rain on Sunday, January 11, 2009 brought flash floods that forced 651 families (3,289 people) in Gingoog City scampering for higher ground. About 9 people were reported missing. The same heavy downpour caused waters to rise in Cagayan de Oro City in 23 barangays The same rain caused electrical power interruptions in these areas. Source: GMATV.News (01/11/09)

While Bicol Region is on a flood watch, rising waters washed away at least 20 homes and made a major bridge in Opol town in Misamis Oriental province closed to vehicular traffic.

In Northern Samar, thousands of people were driven out of their homes as rain water rose and landslides swept the area over the weekend. Many people living in low-lying places had to stay in evacuation centers as they waited for the flood to recede. Six people were reportedly killed when they were buried by landslide in a place called Ocad, Lavezares.

Such damages and human suffering brought by the wicked weather have become more common. Weather watcher Pagasa reports an unusual surge in rainful volume in the last few days which authorities believe may extend till February.

Factors like deforestation and increased population in flood- prone areas are also to blame in the spate of flood-related emergencies. Flood prevention programs like tree planting, dredging of rivers, and relocation of people must be a collective community effort. =0=

RELATED BLOG: “Bicol reforestation “ Posted by mesiamd at 12/16/2008

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Radio Broadcaster Leonilo Mila of Samar, shot dead

December 3, 2008

In another depressing news, Leonilo Mila, a radio personality in Northern Samar reportedly died of gunshot wounds inflicted by unidentified men on Tuesday, December 2, 2008 outside his office in San Roque, Napares, Barangay Zone 3.

Mila reportedly died on site of the shooting with wounds from a 45-caliber pistol on his torso, legs, and head.

The announcer of Radio Natin had been known for his expressed opposition against taxation leveled by the National People’s Army (NPA) on villagers in the area, an angle of the senseless killing the local police is investigating. No suspects to this day is in custody. —Inqurer (12/03/08, Kwok, Abigail)

The brazenness and brutality of this killing again reminds the government and the people of the dangerous path the country is taking. Without a sincere effort by the government and the citizenry to curb these murders and ferret out justice, living in the Philippines will be at one’s own peril. (Photo Credit: Backroad+drifter)=0=

RELATED BLOGS:RELATED BLOGS: Another gruesome journalist’s slay Posted by mesiamd at 11/17/2008; “RP’s 2008 Press Freedom Rank: 142nd out of 173 nations,” Posted by mesiamd at 10/26/2008; “Deteriorating Human Rights Record: another journalist shot dead in Camarines Sur,” posted by mesiamd at 08/16/08.)

UPDATE:The horrific pattern of antagonism and violence against journalists in the Philippines is a disgrace and must end,” said the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ Asia-Pacific) said in a reaction to the death of Aristeo Padrigao, a staunched critic of illegal logging in Mindanao.

Calling for justice, IFJ, bewails the helplessness of RP to stop the killings which have claimed the lives of 61 journalists since 2001 according to the Nuational Union of Jounrnalists in the Philippines NUJP. Inquirer (11/18/08, Kwok, A)