Archive for the ‘Pres. Corazon Aquino’ Category

Cory’s EDSA II apology opens controversies & distrust among Filipinos

December 24, 2008


Calling the EDSA II revolution a mistake, Corazon (Cory) Aquino, one of the leaders of the movement which ousted former Pres. Joseph (Erap) Estrada from power has brought the nation into new controversies. The sudden confession of the ailing former president opened wounds— sowing confusion among doubting Filipinos who bewailed the endemic poor leadership in the national government.

Rather than bridging the often-repeated “reconciliation” among warring political parties, the demure housewife and former chief executive unwittingly exposed the short-sightedness and immaturity of leaders who stood as huge obstacles to the progress of the country. There were those who surmised if cancer and treatment had put her on tremendous strain; her ability to think sanely as before might have taken a beating.

As a devout practitioner of Catholicism, the former president who’s trying to define her legacy as an infuential public servant may have scored high on matters of faith, but she has placed the people in a void of uncertainty whose damage is too early to quantify. The effects are likely to cause lasting shockwaves on how politics will be played in government affairs like the next presidential election. They will cut across the way people will view what is morally right and wrong as they rule over the scandals that see no end.

By seeking Estrada’s forgiveness, Cory repudiated the collective action of her party and those who pushed for an end of blatant thievery, corruption and ineptness during and after Estrada’s administration. The damning evidence of incompetence and plunder laid bare during the 6 years of trial reduced the public to docility and silent acquiescence—- a treacherous problem of Filipinos no wanted to touch.

Like a modern-day soap opera, Estrada’s dizzying legal battle and his privileged imprisonment shown in TVs, radios, and newspapers ended in a conviction hailed by the people. But it was quickly reversed by Pres. Gloria M. Arroyo (GMA)— herself, a sore symbol of almost all things that had gone wrong with the country. Many believed GMA, the current prexy with an outrageously low approval rating of negative (-30) cleverly pardoned Estrada for political convenience. It was unclear though whether Cory’s apology to Estrada was linked to her frustraion over GMA’s mishandling the government. Cory called on her to resign amidst uncurbed corruption as the wagons of Estrada’s political come-back had rolled in from the first station.

Because of Cory’s change of heart, there are deepening doubts on whether Filipino leaders are up for the job of steering the country to better times. In spite of the early justifications and defense for the widow of Benigno (Ninoy) Aquino, her position strengthens the chance of the come-back of the Estrada and his “weather-weather” gang. The Filipinos are left in an impasse: Wala na ba talagang ibang mga magagaling at matitino?

The demoralizing effect of Cory’s declaration puts the Roman Catholic Church (RCC) leadership, a staunch supporter of EDSA II on the defensive. It revives anew the questions on church-state separation and the constitutionality of the power take-overs which left a serious lingering leadership vacuum in all political fronts.

Most of all, it irreparably damaged the Cory brand of uprightness and wisdom she shared with her martyred husband Ninoy Aquino, leaving Filipinos one less of a person to trust and emulate. (Photo Credits: Joe Galvez; Marcial Pontillas21; Marcial Pontillas21; gmaresign; Marcial Pontillas21; Marcial Pontillas21)=0=

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Ninoy Aquino: undimmed, forever young & at play

August 21, 2008

“They shall not grow old
As we that are left grow old
Age shall not weary them
Nor the hourglass condemn
At the going down of the sun

And at the rising of the sun
We shall greet them in our hearts
Undimmed, forever young and at play
In the fields of the Lord.”

—-Warrior King: The Triumph & Betrayal of An American Commander in Iraq (Sassman, Nathan Lt. Col., Martin Press, NY, 2008, p.293)

“It is even more clear to me now that Ninoy was never really mine or my children’s to lose; he has always belonged to the people he chose to serve and to die for,” former Pres. Corazon (Cory) Aquino said of her husband Benigno (Ninoy ) Aquino whose 25th year of his assassination is being remembered this year.

Ninoy Aquino came home from exile in August 21, 1983 from Boston, USA as the prime political adversary of then Pres. Ferdinand Marcos and wife Imelda Marcos. Upon arrival in Manila, he was escorted by military men and minutes later he was gunned down in the tarmac. Years of investigations of the gruesome killing failed to unmask the top people behind the murder. A lone gunman Rolando Galman, killed with Ninoy at the airport, was blamed for the murder. Ninoy’s martyrdom sparked a series of mass actions and protests against Marcos, forcing him out of Malacanang Palace and ending his dictatorship with Imelda.

Today, trying to bring back her health from treatments for colonic cancer, Cory faces new wounds of the ignominious murder whose real mastermind(s) and killer(s) are still on the loose. As the memory of the bloody shooting fades in the memory of the country, the culprits who escape judgement under the law, have gone old or have died of natural causes.

The Marcos family has been “rehabilitated” with the passage of time, rejoining Philippine politics as though nothing so nefarious and brutal ever happened. The case of Ninoy and the conspiracy behind it have been a metaphor of the Filipinos’ lack of trust in the court system. It speaks of the countless murders left unsolved in the country. Not only is justice slow, it’s riddled with corruption and nepotism that favor the rich and powerful. =0=

The dancing senator and her caustic remark

August 18, 2008

You can dance, you can jive, having the time of your life
See that girl, watch that scene, dig in the Dancing Queen
.”
—Dancing Queen, ABBA (from the Broadway Hit “Mama Mia”)

When our senators debate on issues, the arguments suddenly get out of focus. Their exchanges degenerate lower than what we expect from sane people. This is what happened when former Sen. Teresita Aquino-Oreta, argued against Sen. Benigno (Nonoy) Aquino III’s comment that the country hasn’t advanced for 25 years, since this his murdered father, Ninoy Aquino died.

Oreta (well-recalled as the “dancing queen” in the senate floor when she sashayed and wiggled in euphoric glee, during an impeachment proceeding of then Pres. Joseph Estrada in January 2001,) disagreed with Nonoy Aquino’s assessment about the country without giving a satisfactory clarification.

Whether the Philippines moved ahead or not is something that needs explanation. From experience, we have strong opinions about where the country has gone. Oreta could have asked Noynoy what he meant. Or she might have rebutted his opinion with evidence to the contrary. Instead, she turned against former Pres. Corazon Aquino, saying, “His mommy led the country for six years. So please don’t tell us now the country hasn’t moved forward.” PDI (08/18/08, Dalangin-Fernandez, L)

Such corrosive exchanges are typical of family feuds in our households that we don’t want to hear. While we suspect malice and emnity in her statement, Oreta missed proving Noynoy wrong. Instead of being defensive (or firing on the messenger for his message,) she seems in need of more maturity to let us understand that she’s telling the truth or helping us move ahead. =0=

The dancing senator and her caustic remark

August 18, 2008

You can dance, you can jive, having the time of your life
See that girl, watch that scene, dig in the Dancing Queen
.”
—Dancing Queen, ABBA (from the Broadway Hit “Mama Mia”)

When our senators debate on issues, the arguments suddenly get out of focus. Their exchanges degenerate lower than what we expect from sane people. This is what happened when former Sen. Teresita Aquino-Oreta, argued against Sen. Benigno (Nonoy) Aquino III’s comment that the country hasn’t advanced for 25 years, since this his murdered father, Ninoy Aquino died.

Oreta (well-recalled as the “dancing queen” in the senate floor when she sashayed and wiggled in euphoric glee, during an impeachment proceeding of then Pres. Joseph Estrada in January 2001,) disagreed with Nonoy Aquino’s assessment about the country without giving a satisfactory clarification.

Whether the Philippines moved ahead or not is something that needs explanation. From experience, we have strong opinions about where the country has gone. Oreta could have asked Noynoy what he meant. Or she might have rebutted his opinion with evidence to the contrary. Instead, she turned against former Pres. Corazon Aquino, saying, “His mommy led the country for six years. So please don’t tell us now the country hasn’t moved forward.” PDI (08/18/08, Dalangin-Fernandez, L)

Such corrosive exchanges are typical of family feuds in our households that we don’t want to hear. While we suspect malice and emnity in her statement, Oreta missed proving Noynoy wrong. Instead of being defensive (or firing on the messenger for his message,) she seems in need of more maturity to let us understand that she’s telling the truth or helping us move ahead. =0=